Building Sam Pilgrim’s Ridley Noah for Road Bike Party 3

A couple of days before Christmas, Road Bike Party 3 was released to much anticipation throughout the Interwebs. Sam Pilgrim has replaced Martyn Ashton as the rider this time around with about 90% of the film shot in San Diego. I’m always amazed at what these guys can do on a road bike. The video featured here is one I hadn’t seen until today as it has shows the guys from Global Cycling Network building the Ridley Noah that Sam rides during the video. An awesome looking bike to go with an awesome video. The first Road Bike Party video was ridden by Martyn Ashton. Martyn suffered a severe spinal injury during a trials demo on September 1, 2013 that resulted in Martyn losing all feeling below the T9 and T10 vertebrae. Road Bike Party 2 was in development at the time of the accident and was finished with help from Danny McCaskill and Chris Akrigg. That’s Martyn in the wheelchair at the start of the video. And here’s Road Bike Party 3 for those who haven’t seen...

Cycling can be Dangerous

Yesterday we got a stark reminder of how dangerous the sport of cycling can be when Wouter Weylandt was killed during Stage 3 of the Giro de Italia. It’s always a sad day when a cyclist dies regardless if it’s a pro racing a grand tour or a local rider out training or commuting. You never want to see someone lose their life doing something they love. The events of yesterday did get me thinking while I was out riding this morning as I’m sure it did a lot of you too. The events surrounding Wouter Weylandt’s crash are still sketchy as there were apparently only one or two witnesses. It appears they were on a very technical descent and Wouter took his eyes off the road in order to assess the situation behind him. During this brief period he clipped a wall with his pedal or handlebar which caused the crash that lead to death. I haven’t read it in any of the reports but it appears his death was instantaneous which points towards a very gruesome and catastrophic crash. Unfortunately accidents like this do happen in pro cycling. I vividly remember watching the Tour de France in 1995 when Fabio Casartelli was also killed on a descent. While riding this morning I couldn’t help but reflect on yesterday’s events and it struck me that the cause of his crash, a glance backwards, seems so benign in the whole scheme of things. Sure, they were on a technical descent, going fast, but how many times do you think he, or other pros, have taken that look? They probably...

Lessons We Can Learn From The Rescue Of The Chilean Miners

The last couple of days I’ve been watching the dramatic rescue of the 33 Chilean miners. I’ve kept in touch with the story off-and-on since they became trapped but with their rescue over the last two days I’ve kept close tabs as they were pulled to the surface. It’s a great ending to what could have become a tragic story. It required a herculean effort by hundreds of people to pull those miners to safety. I couldn’t help but notice how the entire ordeal seemed to pull the country of Chile together and captivate the world. As I watched the first miner, Florencio Avalos, being pulled to the surface late Tuesday night and the last rescuer, Manuel Gonzalez, stepping into the Phoenix Capsule to make the journey up last night, I couldn’t help but think about what it took for those 33 men, the rescuers, and the country of Chile to make it through the entire ordeal. Here’s what I think it required: Teamwork. There were two distinct teams in the rescue – the trapped miners and the rescuers on the surface. In the mine the 33 miners relied on each other in order to survive. They had to work together in order to live in inhospitable conditions while at the same time keeping their sanity. The rescuers had to work as a team in order to pull off one of the most, if not the most, difficult rescue ever attempted. They brought in expert American drillers, consulted with NASA, developed a plan, and executed it flawlessly. Neither of those groups could have accomplished what they did without teamwork....

How To Start Road Cycling [Again] Ebook

As I told you all several weeks ago, I was going to write an Ebook to help new cyclists, or those returning to road cycling after a long layoff, get started in this great sport. I’ve finally completed it and am ready to release it. For free. As you can tell by the title, it isn’t for the advanced, or even intermediate, road cyclist. It’s basic from the first page and filled with knowledge and tips that I wish I had known when I returned to cycling in 2008. Will it answer every question? No. But I think it’ll help anyone looking for help in deciding where to buy a bike, find out what to carry in a seat bag, or learn what online tools are available for road cycling. To get How To Start Road Cycling [Again] just click on the link below. How-To-Start-Road-Cycling Thumbnail Photoc: Explore The...

Finding Measurable Improvement In Your Cycling

Do you find yourself struggling to get better on the bike? Ever wonder if you’re making any progress at all? I do and I bet others do as well. That’s why I keep a log of my training. It isn’t detailed, or even linked to a GPS enabled cyclocomputer, but it tells me what I need to know about my riding and if I’m making any progress. For instance, I went back and looked at my rides over the past three weeks to see how my average speed was doing. I felt like I was riding faster but I wanted to see if there was any truth to my ‘feelings’. I went back through three weeks of data and found the following: Average Speed Three Weeks Ago – 13.475 mph Average Speed Two Weeks Ago – 13.775 mph Average Speed 1 week ago – 13.975 mph Those aren’t huge numbers, only a .5 mph increase, but considering my level of fitness and weight, they tell me that I’m improving. Do I feel like some of that improvement Is due to my ongoing Fit with Bicycle Lab? Yes, but I think part of it is due to my legs coming back as well. Regardless, I wouldn’t have been able to look at this data if I wasn’t logging my rides. Seeing empirical data showing progress is important because I don’t feel like I’m making much progress on the bike. Granted, I’ve only been riding again for a month but I feel like my gains are coming very, very slowly and I’m not making headway on my weight. At all. Not...

Do You Have A Training Mindset?

If you’re like me, when you think of ‘training’, as it relates to sports, or cycling, you immediately conjure images of athletes training for sporting events such as the Tour de France, Ironman Kona, or the Olympics. Isn’t that what training is all about? Getting the skills, experience, and conditioning in so that you can compete, or perform, at a higher level? Yes, but I think the word ‘training’ can apply to more than just professional cyclists and athletes. I’m not just talking about my fellow cyclists who are riding centuries every other week, climbing 8000 feet a weekend, or racing at the amateur level. I’m talking about people out there, like me, who have weight to lose. It takes a lot of effort and commitment in order to lose that weight. Or to get into better shape. Or to finish that century in under six hours. I’m not saying we’re going to compete in the 2011 Quiznos Pro Challenge but can we take a page from the pros and adopt their mentality and work ethic? I say yes. Being In Training Means A 24/7 Commitment Too many of us, myself included, think of our cycling as a 1-2 hour per day commitment and we can get what we need out of it. We spin our miles before work, at lunch, or in the evening. We catch a group ride on the weekend to get a few more miles in. But are we actually pushing ourselves to do our best by only devoting a fraction of the day to our training? Hardly. There are some of you out there...
Page 1 of 712345...Last »