Cycling for Optimal Weight – A Mission

A few weeks ago, Darryl over at Lovingthebike.com and Kelli of Apex Nutriton, unveiled a new training program called Cycling for Optimal Weight. Darryl and Kelli released a mini-ebook that covers both the cycling and nutrition sides of getting fit and healthy with the sport of cycling. The ebook (which is totally free by the way) is filled with some great tips and I love the section at the end where they include sample eating plans tailored to when you are riding – morning, mid-day or in the evneing. I decided to take them up on their offer to track my progress and have already filled out my assessment, taken my starting measurements (rope and choke), and snapped a couple of profile photos. The measurements and photos were an eye opening experience but I kinda had an idea of how bad they would be. As I work with Darryl and Kelli to get this weight off, I’ll keep you informed of my progress here on Biking To Live. I’ll do my best to relay to you what I’m going through, the riding I’m doing, and what I’m eating. I believe I’m going to learn a lot and it’ll be the perfect opportunity to pass that info along to you, my readers, as you work to improve your health with cycling. Why did I decide to try their plan? Well, there are a few reasons: Darryl is a great person. I’ve come to know him personally over the last six to eight months and the encouragement he’s shown me has been awesome. I couldn’t imagine working with another person to...

Broken Spokes, Not Broken Spirits

My riding has been a little sporadic lately. I’ve gotten two or three early morning rides during the week but nothing consistent. I could make the typical excuses – I’m tired, sick, need the rest, blah, blah, blah. I’ll save my breath and your time. Great Day For A Ride I hit the road on Saturday for a planned 20 mile ride but only ended up getting about 12 in. It was a beautiful morning for a ride with the skies partly cloudy and the temps in the mid 60s. Just an awesome morning to be out for a ride. And I felt pretty good too. A perfect recipe for problems. Until The ‘Twang’ At about the six mile point I’m riding along and I hear a ‘Twang’ followed by the sound of a metallic object bouncing on the road. I immediately pull over and start walking back to where the sound occurred to see if I could see what the object was. I see it and immediately recognize it as a spoke. I look at my rear wheel and found where it came from. Now I could either call the SAG WagonSAG wagon: Support motor vehicle following long races or recreational rides to pick up riders unable to complete the event. In other words, I'd have to call my wife. or try and make it home. I decided to ride a little bit and see how it went. I didn’t ride hard the last six miles home and the wheel held up just fine. Cycling Tip: If your broken spoke is still attached to the rim, just bend...

How To Start Road Cycling [Again] Ebook

As I told you all several weeks ago, I was going to write an Ebook to help new cyclists, or those returning to road cycling after a long layoff, get started in this great sport. I’ve finally completed it and am ready to release it. For free. As you can tell by the title, it isn’t for the advanced, or even intermediate, road cyclist. It’s basic from the first page and filled with knowledge and tips that I wish I had known when I returned to cycling in 2008. Will it answer every question? No. But I think it’ll help anyone looking for help in deciding where to buy a bike, find out what to carry in a seat bag, or learn what online tools are available for road cycling. To get How To Start Road Cycling [Again] just click on the link below. How-To-Start-Road-Cycling Thumbnail Photoc: Explore The...

Finding Measurable Improvement In Your Cycling

Do you find yourself struggling to get better on the bike? Ever wonder if you’re making any progress at all? I do and I bet others do as well. That’s why I keep a log of my training. It isn’t detailed, or even linked to a GPS enabled cyclocomputer, but it tells me what I need to know about my riding and if I’m making any progress. For instance, I went back and looked at my rides over the past three weeks to see how my average speed was doing. I felt like I was riding faster but I wanted to see if there was any truth to my ‘feelings’. I went back through three weeks of data and found the following: Average Speed Three Weeks Ago – 13.475 mph Average Speed Two Weeks Ago – 13.775 mph Average Speed 1 week ago – 13.975 mph Those aren’t huge numbers, only a .5 mph increase, but considering my level of fitness and weight, they tell me that I’m improving. Do I feel like some of that improvement Is due to my ongoing Fit with Bicycle Lab? Yes, but I think part of it is due to my legs coming back as well. Regardless, I wouldn’t have been able to look at this data if I wasn’t logging my rides. Seeing empirical data showing progress is important because I don’t feel like I’m making much progress on the bike. Granted, I’ve only been riding again for a month but I feel like my gains are coming very, very slowly and I’m not making headway on my weight. At all. Not...

Using Google Maps To Recon A Bike Ride

Internet technology has come a long way in the last five years. One area in particular that I use a lot is online mapping. Specifically Google Maps. I use it to look up directions, find restaurants/stores close to my home, and to look at potential bike routes. When combining some of the tools available within Google Maps it can also be used to recon a potential bike ride you may be planning to do. This is especially helpful if you’ve never ridden the route before. This SundaySaturday is an organized bicycle ride in Lancaster, Tx called the Lancaster Country Ride Presented by the Greater Dallas Bicyclists. Since I had never done an organized ride before, I was available this weekend, and Lancaster wasn’t that far away, I thought I might try it. I didn’t know anything about the route so I took a look at the 23-mile route on the website and then headed to Google Maps. (Click any pic below to enlarge) Plot The Route Google Maps doesn’t have a route planning function like Map My Ride but you can still achieve a similar result by using directions. Since the route started in downtown Lancaster I found two businesses near the start/finish and told Google to give me some directions. The route it gave me was only 362 feet, by bicycle, which was to be expected. If you move your mouse over the route you can drag the route Google gave you to follow a route you want. I did this and stretched the route from 362 feet to 23 miles by following the 23-mile cue sheet found...

Six Tips To Repairing A Bicycle Flat Tire

Getting a flat while out riding will happen to all of us at some point. It’s inevitable. Just as sure as the Sun will come up each day we can all look forward to it. It doesn’t have to be the end of the days ride though if you’re prepared and know a few tips to make it easier. Six Tips To Easier Flat Repair Be prepared. If you’re out riding with no way to repair your own flat then you’re riding on borrowed time. If you’re riding with friends you may be able to bum something off one of them but if you’re all alone and 30 miles from nowhere then you’re what I like to call ‘screwed’. Being prepared starts with having the equipment needed to repair your own flat – patch kit, tube, tire levers, pump/CO2, etc. Most all of this can be easily carried in a seat bag and I discuss this in the article I wrote about what you should carry in a bicycle seat bag. Having the right tools doesn’t help if you’ve never used them though. Practice changing tubes while at home until you get the hang of it. Shift to the smallest cog if the flat is on the rear. Putting the chain on the smallest cog on the cassette will make it much easier to remove and install the rear wheel. Chances are you won’t be in the smallest cog when you notice the flat. To get the chain there just shift the gears, pick up the rear wheel by grabbing your seat with one hand, grasp a pedal with...
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