Bicycle Comparison Chart

Most of you know I’m searching for a new bike. My price point is right in the neighborhood of $800 which doesn’t let me get to the 105 component level I want unless I can find me a good deal used (which I’m open to) or buy online (I’m skeptical of doing). I do know that I want at least a 9 speed rear cog set and would like STI. I’m open for compromises such as considering a triple chainwheel set instead of a double. After finally concluding that I won’t be challenging Lance or Levi in the Tour De France I’ve decided that I can probably forgo my 105 requirement. At most I’ll be doing the organized ride which would be more for distance riding rather than placing. The number one priority of my new bike is, as it always has been, to help me lose weight.

I decided to make myself a handy-dandy chart to help me along and to show you what I’m looking at (the real reason for the chart is because I’m an Excel geek that can’t help myself). I did get an email from a guy who has a 2007 Specialized Allez Elite Triple that sounds promising. He’s sending me pics tonight to look at.

Those bikes in the chart below labeled as ‘local’ are available at a Local Bike Shop while the ‘online’ bikes are available at Bikes Direct. There are advantages and disadvantages to buying at either place. I wish there was a Bikes Direct store here in Dallas that I could go look at some of their bikes. We have one back home in Florida but, alas, I’m not there right now. I didn’t include any bikes from Performance Bikes but those are options too. In fact, I’m thinking of hitting their store tonight just to see what they have since it’s been so long since I’ve been in there.

Bicycle Comparison Chart (click to enlarge)

Bicycle Comparison Chart (click to enlarge)

Update:

I mentioned earlier about a guy with a 2007 Allez Elite. It’s actually a double not a triple. Pics of it are below. My initial thoughts are that it looks to have been ridden hard which isn’t necessarily bad. The cogs do look pretty grimy to me and the entire bike needs a cleaning. I’m not sure about the cranks. On the plus size, he wants $500 for it which seems like a great deal. I’d value my readers opinions.

I downsize the pics he sent me since they were around 2mb each.

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Side View

Author: Bryan

I'm developing a healthy lifestyle through cycling and invite you to join me in my journey. Comments are always welcome so feel free to share yours below.

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14 Comments

  1. I'd definitely go for the Trek 1.5.
    For my mind, the compact crankset is a boon for beginner riders like us. I reckon it is the single biggest factor in me getting over some of the local hills. The flappy paddle gears (STi) are awesome and fun and I don't think you can go past the Bontrager wheelset.

    Add to that, it's from a LBS and I'm all for supporting local shops and companies.

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    • I'm looking forward to STI shifters and not having to take my hands off the bars to shift.

      I don't think the Allez above looks too bad either. As you said, with a through cleaning and service, and new black bar tape, I think it could look real nice. Also, with the extra cash I can get a new helmet and a few other things I want.

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  2. I dono. Don't sell yourself short on a bike. I rode an Allez Sport Triple with Sora shifters and I absolutely *hated* them.

    For distance riding, especially ultra-distance riding, and hills, you can't beat a triple. Yeah, the other roadies will point and giggle. I still consider them better than a compact double.

    The Bikes Direct website amuses me. They talk about “scored a super deal on a shipment” of some bike or another when pretty much the only place that sells those bikes is Bikes Direct.

    My present plan, as I am also in the market, is to buy a Bikes Direct bike largely for the components and then move them to a frame of my choosing, probably either a steel frame oriented towards randonnee riding or a cyclocross frame of some sort

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    • I've always read that shifting on the triples can be finicky. I've always ridden a double and wanted to stay that way if I could.

      Your plan to buy a Bikes Direct bike and move the components to another frame is something I've heard others doing. I read last night over on Bike Forums that Cycle Spectrum sales Bikes Direct bikes. There's one here in Dallas that I thought about going to check out. We had a Bikes Direct store in Jacksonville and they had a Kestrel there that I totally fell in love with. Everywhere I read says that if you buy from Bikes Direct to take it to your LBS to have assembled and all the bearings re-packed.

      I think Weiland bought a CX bike from there so I wonder what he has to say about them.

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      • A triple properly setup shifts just fine, every time.

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        • I'm sure they do but a lot of what you can read leads you to believe there's a stigma with the triple. I'm sure it has something to do with the 'pros' devout devotion to the double. :-)

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  3. Does look like a good ole fashion cleaning would be in order! Great price, Can you test drive it?LOL

    Post a Reply
    • Everyone, please welcome Mrs. BikingToLive to the blog. I believe that was her first post ever here.

      Yes dear, it needs a good ole fashion cleaning. You know how I am with that kind of stuff so that's no biggie. I'm waiting to hear back on when I can go see it and 'test drive' it.

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  4. My wife and I just purchaased new bikes (Trek 2.1). The advantage of purchasing locally is that you have a place to take your bike for service and they may have custom fiting options available for you. I know at our local shop they meticulously measured us to get the proper sizing. Also with the saddle guarantee we were able to switch out saddles till we found a comfortable one, which is major if you intend to do long rides. Our shop also throws in free tune ups for the first year and will discounts for clothes and accessories. So I hope this helps. Your local shop may be a little more but the support you get may be invaluable toward your future enjoyment. Hope this helps

    Post a Reply
    • Mannyo, thanks for stopping by.

      Purchasing new bikes at a local store definitely has advantages and you did a great job of listing them. I went with the used option because I could get a good bike a lot cheaper than buying new. I've also been around bikes for a while so I was comfortable with not needing the custom fit options and tune ups. Although, free tune ups and discounts is great.

      How's the wife riding for you and your wife coming along with the new bikes?

      Post a Reply
      • She riding great for me and on the bikes we are doing great. We will be using them in a sprint triathlon and have started riding with our local bike club. Hope you enjoy your bike and ride on.

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        • Good luck with the sprint triathlon. I'm loving my new bike.

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  5. She riding great for me and on the bikes we are doing great. We will be using them in a sprint triathlon and have started riding with our local bike club. Hope you enjoy your bike and ride on.

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  6. Good luck with the sprint triathlon. I'm loving my new bike.

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